Archive for March, 2008

One more example of SALLA 3 installation inside house garage.

“Very happy with the sauna! Thank you.” – Andrew D.

Today, I would like to talk about sauna maintenance, which is important if you want to enjoy it for longer. The good news is that having your own sauna requires very little effort to maintain.

Taking care of the timber:

While sweating in a sauna may cause discoloration of the timber over time, it is easy to avoid by simply sitting on a towel. The high temperature inside the sauna takes good care of the moisture buildup on the walls and ceiling. Leave the door open for about half an hour to an hour after sauna session to ensure the sauna dries off completely.

As mentioned, using towel to sit on is a good idea to keep the benches in better condition. You still need to clean them now and then depending on how often you use the sauna. Normally every three to four months. Remember, not to use any harsh or ammonia based chemical cleaners as this may damage the timbers.

You can use mild detergent to wash the wood and rinse it with clear water afterwards. Or even better use one of our product specifically designed for this purpose:


‘TOLU’ sauna cleaner (made in Finland) – $49.95

‘TOLU’ sauna cleaner is good for cleaning and removing stains. It must be mixed with the water in a non-metallic container. While wearing rubber gloves wash with the brush the entire area of each wall and
bench.  Rinse them with clear water when finished. It is also OK to slightly sand the wood if it becomes heavily discolored.

Taking care of the stove:

There’s no need to do any special maintenance of your sauna stove besides wiping its surfaces.

Use only soft cloth and mild detergent to wash the stove. Do not use hard brush or steel wool. This can scratch the stove finish and cause rusting.

If having problems with the stove always consult with certified electrician in your area. It’s very dangerous to do your own electrical repairs unless you really know what you are doing.

From time to time as a normal wear and tear process your heater would require element replacements. It is advisable to ask your heater supplier if they carry elements in stock. Otherwise it might become a very expensive exercise and you might as well consider changing the supplier.

Never use sauna stove without rocks as it can cause elements burning.

A wood-burning heater, on the other hand, requires a bit more maintenance. The ashes must be removed on a regular basis and the exhaust pipe must be kept clean of obstructions. Be careful of creosote buildup in the exhaust pipe. It can be a dangerous fire hazard, so regular inspection is a MUST to ensure the safety of your sauna.

Sauna Rocks:
 
Sauna rocks or stones should be checked every once in a while to ensure they are not cracking.  Due to frequent heating and cooling, the sauna rocks are under high pressure and need to be replaced from time to time (depending how often you use the sauna). Not all the stones are good for sauna. Good rocks are peridotite and olivine with rough surface as they release the steam faster. You can always order your rocks from Ukko Saunas:


Sauna Rocks: $89.00

You also should consider replacing the stones if they are giving off a bad odor. Remember to rinse the stones with clear water and dry before putting them in to the stove for the first time. This shall be done only once with the new stones.

Summary:

Saunas are very easy to maintain than other bathrooms (e.g. steam bath, spa or hot tub).  If you are concerned about sauna maintenance involved – stop worrying! Saunas are one of the most carefree areas of your home.